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faucet holes in granite
Last Post 12 Dec 2010 04:56 AM by nssthan. 21 Replies.
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Brady Hudson
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06 Jul 2010 12:27 PM
    Why are we toasting holesaw bits on granite faucet holes?  We haven't done alot a of granite, as we have been mostly involved in Engineered stone.  We've got that product down pretty well, however when we are drilling faucet holes in granite onsite, we are using the "cup" to hold water and keep adding water to the cup as we drill.  The water is boiling hot and the bit is glowing with heat. 

    What are we doing wrong?

    Can someone provide me the bit and tool they use to cut faucet holes?

    Thanks.

    Brady

    Dani Homrich
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    06 Jul 2010 04:43 PM
    Sounds like to much speed and (or) the bit is worn out, no Diamond where you need it to cut the hole. Also the Diamond is electroplated to the bit, if you get the bit Red Hot the Diamond will lose the bond to the steel and break or fall off.
    Changing the way you finish your tops.
    Brady Hudson
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    06 Jul 2010 11:30 PM

    thanks Dani!

     

    I think this is what we have learned today...too fast.  We are used to cutting Quartz and it cuts alot easier!

     

    Brady

    Brian Stone
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    07 Jul 2010 01:11 PM
    We use bits like these to drill in granite or quartz.

    GranQuartz Core Bit


    If you're heating the bit up to the point of boiling the water then you're glazing over the bit. Basically you're heating up the metal and that is letting the diamonds release from the matrix before new ones are exposed. At that point you're attempting to cut granite with a smooth piece of metal.

    Take the bit that you have and drill a couple holes in a sandy stone, concrete, or a cinder block. That will remove the bare metal and expose more diamonds.

    At that point I would try to reduce the speed of the grinder, increase the pressure that you're using, and increase the amount of water if possible. Whenever we can we drill holes in the shop so that we can use a hose to supply water.

    If you're trying to drill into a super hard granite you may even want to re-dress the bit (drill into some concrete) when you're half way through the material just in case the bit is starting to glaze.
    Chris Yaughn
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    08 Jul 2010 02:04 AM
    Take your time.  You can't really think about engineered stone and granite the same way when you drill faucets on site.  ES is a breeze to punch holes in.



    If the bit gets red hot, you should have stopped a while ago.  YOu also have to be careful not to heat the stone up so much it generates a hairline crack back to the sink.

    refuse to do nothing
    Topshop
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    03 Dec 2010 07:19 PM
    I have used ice cubes inside the core bit to help keep it cool.
    John Christensen
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    03 Dec 2010 08:56 PM
    That is a clever idea

    Johnny C
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    Brian Stone
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    03 Dec 2010 10:36 PM
    Posted By Topshop on 03 Dec 2010 02:19 PM
    I have used ice cubes inside the core bit to help keep it cool.

    Sometimes us northerners will pack the core bit with snow. I guess it just matters what is available at the time.
    KCWOOD
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    04 Dec 2010 02:43 AM

    I've watch my stone guys drill a few holes in quartz and granite...  both times I was amazed at how it just went through like butter, actually seemed faster than my solid surface holes...

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    04 Dec 2010 04:22 AM
    Brady:

    Check out this video. They demonstrate it without the available vac.

    Joe
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    04 Dec 2010 01:06 PM
    It also really depends on what(who's) bit you are running. I find that if you buy the dry cutting bits and use them with some water they cut nice and last nearly forever.
    nssthan
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    08 Dec 2010 12:32 AM
    Here is a video that might help.


    nssthan
    Brian Stone
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    09 Dec 2010 01:19 PM
    You're going to burn up that polisher pretty quick drill core holes with it. The gears inside don't handle the torque very well. We picked up a pneumatic grinder a while back and it is great for stuff like that.
    nssthan
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    09 Dec 2010 03:35 PM
    At our place we have order numbers for all of our granite orders. We are currently on order 01-4365. That means that we have produced 4365 orders. That part is the fact, the guess though is that half of those orders have needed holes drilled. We have 2 polishers that worked without fail for the entire time. We have gone through countless grinders though. So if by quickly you mean more than years and years... And I might need to check my physics on this one, but it takes less torque to spin something 1 3/8 diameter than it does 4 inches in diameter.
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    10 Dec 2010 03:44 AM
    nssthan:

    Brady started this thread looking for a method by which to drill faucet holes in a customer's home. I appreciate your video, but even using a pneumatic polisher and water, practically impossible in a customers home, you took 45 seconds to drill a 1 3/8" hole. The Rotozip ExCore I linked to has a video showing the same hole drilled dry, a vac attachment would allow in-home use, in fifteen seconds.

    Joe
    nssthan
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    10 Dec 2010 04:58 PM

    I just made another video to show drilling six 1 3/8" holes while only changing the speeds on a variable speed angle grinder. When I drilled the hole on speed #3 or 7000rpm it reduced the time to 20 seconds. Because it was a visual demonstration whoever wants to argue will have to beat science.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yiPLsMwHfx8

    Now, if my math is correct and you are paying your guy $25 per hour they will have to drill 5143 holes just to pay for the $180 tool. I figure I can help them shave the 5 seconds somewhere else in the day without having to pay the money.

    Now for you Joe, I wore ear plugs. Remember when clinton said that he "didn't inhale", well I didn't really push them in. One step at a time



    nssthan
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    11 Dec 2010 01:48 AM
    Than:

    This is kind of silly. You are drilling through 2cm, the video to which I linked drilled through 3cm in fifteen seconds dry. Should we add 1/3 to your times for comparison? What about the time you spent dressing the bit?

    Again, Brad started this thread seeking a good solution for drilling in home, on site. The curtains at the window over the sink are going to be a splattered mess with all the water you're using. I'll pay $180.00 to avoid a P.O.'ed customer anytime.

    They are not comparable.

    Joe
    nssthan
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    11 Dec 2010 02:21 AM
    First of all the initial question was using that suction cup thing and boiling the water. Second, there was at least one post talking about the speed to drill at. And last, your link only went to the Braxton catalog not to a video.

    Seriously, you went to the curtains? I drilled 6 holes! And how many guys talked about a wet solution. Recognize the intent. Do not automatically jump to slower is better unless you can prove it. From my little experiment you can see speed variation results and if your comfortable having a rotozip in your tool box -- get one, but it's not your tool; it's the diamonds, temp, AND the speed.

    Dressing th bit was only to ensure that each new speed was not effected by the last hole. Come on man! Don't you have kids in science?? You can only have 1 variable at a time.

    Nssthan
    Bill Wolle
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    11 Dec 2010 12:53 PM
    Nssthan,

    Welcome to your baptism of Joe.

    Every once in awhile I forget, but not often. You are learning.

    Bill
    Just because you "can" or it is legal to do something does not mean you should.

    bwolle@msn.com
    Topshop
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    11 Dec 2010 12:55 PM
    You have a better chance of the core bit not grabbing/walking when starting a hole if the bit is turning faster.

    I think the original poster just needs to get some better quality core bits. I have tested core bits for a distributor (Calibre resources) before and not all core bits are created equal. The fastest cutting bits I ever tried were experimental ones that I have no idea what brand they were - it kills me that I never got the name of them. I don't drill too many holes these days and still have the bit somewhere.

    It is best to drill everything you can in the shop and not in a customers home.
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